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20121010
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: i'm tom hudson. president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail, but still debating taxes. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. the feds launch one of the largest crackdowns on medicare fraud. $430 million in scams leads to arrests from coast to coast. >> tom: and we'll introduce you to a company hoping to become the mcdonald's for healthy eaters. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: it was right back to the campaign trail today for president obama and mitt romney. the president went on the attack after what's been perceived as a lackluster debate performance. and the president accused governor romney of not telling americans the truth about what president obama calls romney's $5 trillion tax plan. darren gersh, tonight, looks at what the real impact of the romney tax plan could be on the american economy. >> reporter: here's where the president gets that $5 trillion number he used again today. governor romney's plan to cut tax rates by 20% would add up to about $5 trillion over ten years, assuming no other
happy than a healthy job market. from recent college grads to president obama, their future might look more certain if companies really ramped up hiring. economists say there's too much uncertainty on the horizon for that to happen any time soon. the good news is that firms have stopped cutting jobs. the bad news is they're still too nervous to hire more than a handful of new workers. friday, economists predict the september employment report will show a modest 113,000 new positions were added, barely better than august. still, some believe current data underestimates what's really happening with hiring. >> the perception of the labor market is probably more like a world where we're adding 150,000 jobs a month, which isn't good, but certainly better than the numbers are printing which is only around 100,000 or so. >> reporter: anecdotal evidence supports that assessment too. this new york staffing firm primarily places workers in administrative jobs, and says it's finding the market surprisingly strong. today, good candidates are quickly turning temporary positions into full time jobs.
. that's the lowest level since january 2009, when president obama took office. even more remarkable is the reason for the drop. >> the unemployment rate decline was not because people dropped out of the labor force. to the contrary. the labor force actually but the household survey estimate of employment increased even more. >> reporter: the household survey shows total employment rose by 873,000. that's the biggest gain since ronald reagan was president. but there's a catch. two-thirds of those jobs are part-time positions, taken because no full-time work was available. and there's another troubling sign: >> what we have is hiring that is concentrated, most recently, in the government sector. hiring that is concentrated, most recently in education and healthcare. a little bit of positive news coming from construction. but in a lot of the business services and goods-producing industries and manufacturing, things look pretty soft at this moment. >> reporter: in addition, 2,000 temporary jobs were cut, which is often looked at as a barameter of future employment. but, the average work
&p; it's up about a point. >> reporter: i'm darren gersh. still ahead, both mitt romney and barack obama want to put more americans back to work. but is job training the right answer? we'll take a look. >> tomsix months before e credit crunch hit full force, j.p. morgan bought failing investment bank bear stearns. that was in 2007. now, j.p. morgan faces a lawsuit, claiming it inherited massive fraud on the part of the company it purchased. the civil lawsuit alleges systemic fraud with the packaging and sale of mortgage- backed securities by bear stearns before it was taken over by j.p. morgan. the bank says it intends to fight the case. eric schneiderman is the attorney general of new york. >> eric, you represent the people of new york state. what did your citizens lose in the deals thaw are accused of being fraudulent? >> new yorkers, like people all over the united states bought shares in mortgage backed securities, pension funds invested in them. people bought homes baseed on what they thought was the realistic value of the housing market. we've learned that the housing bubble, sxlt
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)